Skip to main content

Full text of "The Collegiate"

See other formats


IR378.75fc 

At a P 

nz.9 



-tH£ 



a 



o 




^£G\^ 



\ 



fy 




For Reference 

Not to be taken from this room 



The 
Collegiate 



PUBLISHED BY 

STUDENT BODY 

Atlantic Christian College 
WILSON, n. c. 

WILLIAM WIEGMANN ROBERT GRADY 

Editor-in-Chief Business Manager 



+\ 378.756 

r 



Af^j 



^Z^) 



c. l. hardy umm 

ATLANTIC CHRIST'AN COLLEGE 
WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 



o 



rder of Books 



BOOK I 

THE COLLEGE 

BOOK II 
CLASSES 

BOOK III 

ORGANIZATIONS 

BOOK IV 

ATHLETICS 



FOREWORD 



This last issue of the Collegiate represents a radical depar- 
ture from the standard policy of publishing a College Annual 
by the Senior Class at the end of each year. This has been 
found too expensive for the average small college, and for this 
reason, we are attempting to give the students of Atlantic 
Christian College a publication that will fulfill the require- 
ments of and the desire for such a publication without the un- 
reasonable expense usually attached. 

We admit the imperfections and defects of this edition, but 
we trust that because this is an experiment undertaken by an 
inexperienced staff, these defects will be overlooked by a sym- 
pathetic public that knows the trials of a college staff that 
must depend upon inadequate knowledge and material for its 
success. If this adventure proves even a partial success, we 
hope to carry the idea further and believe that in doing so we 
may make a worthwhile contribution to the small college pub- 
lication system. We gratefully acknowledge the cooperation 
of those faithful and spirited individuals who have given their 
services so freely that the Collegiate might be a success. 

The Editor. 



49098 



IIJIIMIM'.'MIIIIMIIIIIIMIIIIMIIIIIIIIII'IIM.IIIIIII.'IIIIIIII.IIMMI.IIII'NIIIMIIIIMIIIIillllMIIIII Ilh II III I III Mill HIM' III' "I 'j 




Blllllllll ll llllllllllllll l Ililllllliliiillllllllllllilililiiiliiiiiiiiini ii iiiiihimiiiiiMim illinium iiiiiiiiinii; 



President H. S. Hil/ev 



attitude, we are now entering upon 



second 



birth. In the near future A. C. C. will be the 
leading Liberal Arts College east of Raleigh. On 
this page is the architect's drawing of the cam- 
pus which is already under construction. This 
forty-two acre plot will furnish one of the 
beautiful and spacious sites for a college 
anywhere in the country. The first unit 
of buildings is under construction as the 
first step in the program of making 
A. C. C. a great college. Our program 
may seem small when compared with 
Chapel Hill but when we consider 
that our state university is being 
built out of tax money furnished 
by the entire state, and our new 
college will be built and main- 
tained bv the sacrificial giving 
of 25,000 Disciples, we see 
the enormity of our task. 
But under the capable and 
consecrated direction of 
Pres. Howard S. Hilley, 
the task is being push- 




•flN the 

H 1928 Pine 
Knot the Edi- 
tor spoke of 
the four periods 
of the history of 
Atlantic Christian 
College. The peri- 
ods of the beginning 
of the institution of 
the slow constructive 
growth, and of the 
rapid expansion have 
passed, and we have now 
entered upon the fourth pe- 
riod. This period is and will 
be characterized by a new 
birth. The college was estab- 
lished to furnish educational op- 
portunities for the youth of the 
Disciples of Christ and to train min- 
isters for our churches. In this re 
spect it has been a marked success. 
Graduates of this college now hold 
many of the important pulpits of the 
south, and many younger men who have 
recently left and are now in training give 
promise to become the leading ministers of 
the Disciples. But during this period, an- 
other problem arose. Less than half the stu 
dent body enrolled last year came from Disci 
pie homes. This means that not only our own 
people, but all eastern North Carolina is looking 
to A. C. C. as the leading college. Because of this 



ed forward to comple- 
tion and we hope that 
within a year we 
will have a trium- 

eater 
Christian 



Page Five 



4 




I Campus 

1 



Page Six 




Girls Dormitory 



Page Seven 




Boys Dormitory 



I 



Page Eight 




Imxlty I0aB-'29 



Howard S. Hilley 

F. F. Grimm 

Mrs. A. R. Moore 

J. Watson Shockley 

C. K. Holsapple 

Miss Frances Harper 

Miss Myrtle Harper 

Miss Martha Edmundston 

Miss Ruth French 

Frank J. Hufty 

Dr. B. G. Carson 

Mrs. Mamie Jennings Lucas 

C. H. Hamlin 

Miss Ada Lee Cannaday 

T. L. Anthony 
Mildred D. Ross 
E. T. Stallings 



President and Prof, of Ancient 

Languages 
Dean of Men and Prof, of Education 
Dean of Women 
Prof, of Bible 

Head of English Department 
Prof, of Mathematics 
Librarian 

Prof, of Modern Languages 
Prof, of Music- 
Prof, of Voice 

Head of Science Department 
Prof, of Dramatics and Public 

Speaking 
Head of Social Science Department 
Assistant Prof, of English and 

Science 
Coach and Assistant Prof, of History 
Registrar 
Prof, of Violin 



Page Nine 



Booh ZTwo 
CLASSES 

Senior Class 



As we come to the end of one point in our life which marks the completion of our 
schooldays we look back over the past and realize that we are no longer children, 
that the day has come when "we put away childish things." 

We treasure the past and dream into the future. The success of a voyage depends 
partly upon the manner in which we launch off, and we feel that our embarking 
upon this voyage of life is conducive to a successful trip, as we crown the efforts of 
our past with an A. B. degree. 

The past four years of our life has been the scene of many great changes. Our 
environment and our study has led us to think for ourselves, so much so, that we 
feel competent to enter into this new section of our life. 

.We wonder now what the future holds in store for us. We believe that our train- 
ing at A. C. C. will hold and pilot us through, but we fully realize that life is what 
we make it, that we are living in a dynamic age, one of evolution and revolution 
and that to march with the tide we. must adjust ourselves to the environment and 
take our place in line either near the front or the back. 

As we look upon life in its newer aspect it is clearly seen that the world will soon 
be in the hands of the younger generation, the college graduate. The day has come 
when an A. B. degree is just as essential to a happy and successful life as was the 
high school course a few years back. Even now we see the young graduate taking 
his place among the leaders of the world in every phase of life, and as we see this 
our hopes and beliefs for the future are strengthened. 

In the days to come, while we are struggling with the many problems of life we will 
be able to look back to A. C. C. and find many solutions for these problems. 
A. C, C. will be a guiding light. Our purpose here was not to prepare for a profes- 
sion but to complete for life the foundation that was begun at home. We can now 
say that we know in the words of Longfellow: 

"Life is real, life is earnest 
And the grave is not its goal; 
Dust thou art to dust returneth 
Was not spoken of the soul." 



THE CLASS Ol 
Pres. J. Robert Grady 

Treas 
Virginia Forbes 
R. N. Hinnant 
Kate Brinson 
Esther Ricks 
Hattie Mae Ricks 
Melba Gay 



•2!) 



Monroe Fulghum 
Hilary Bowen 
S. T. Cherry 
Hazel Sasser 
Pattie Thompson 



Sec. Mary Mattox 
Cora Lee Osborne 

Sarah Askew 
Dallas Mallison 
Walton Thompson 
Dixie Boswell 
Mabel Amerson 
Catherine Ware 
Eva Mae Scott 
Margaret Leggett 
Irene Harrison 
Nina Belangia 
Eloise Grady 
Pauline Cox 



Page Ten 



Junior Class 



Colors: Pink and White Flowers: Pink and White Roses 

Aim: To Graduate Motto: Love — Labor — Laugh. 

Officers: President Needham Bryan 

Vice-President James Denny 

Secretary Eloise Grady 

There is no word quite so pleasant to the ear of a Junior as that of "Junior." It 
means that much of the road of toil has been passed and that there still remains 
another year to "Love, Labor and Laugh." There is not that rather sad feeling of 
"this is the last year of college life" — and the titles "Fresh" and "Soph" have been 
successfully lived down. Indeed, there is no place in college student ranking as de- 
sirable as that of Junior. 

The Junior Class of 1929-30 is made up of a majority of town students. In fact, 
there is a greater number of outside students in this class than any other in college. 
So, it stands to reason, with these people bringing in all the news of the outside 
world, that we have the best informed class in college. 

Again the Junior class is unusual in that it chose a motto that can be realized — 
not one to be laughed at as impossible. "Love, Labor and Laugh." The first and 
last words of the motto need no comment. Eyes and ears tell us that the Junior is 
very much accomplished along both lines. In regard to the Labor one finds on ex- 
amining the records of the Juniors that their grades make a satisfactory average. 

The only fault to be found with the Junior class of 1929-30 is that next year it 
will be the Senior class. 

Sophomore Class 

OFFICERS 

Charles Bissette President 

Doris Barefoot Vice-President 

Herberta Stuckey Sec. -Treasurer 

Lotta Carawan Student Councilor 

The class of '31 began its four years of hard labor in the fall of 1927. Enthus- 
iastic and eager for knowledge, they fell to it with a vim and spirit which was un- 
beatable. Today with two years of their allotted four gone by, their spirit is still 
raring to go, and, like Alexander of old, they are longing for new worlds to conquer. 
Whereupon one of the present Juniors arises and makes the announcement that con- ' 
quering the Junior course is a job that would make even the doughty Alexander a 
bit uncertain of his mighty powers. But what price that? What class with the 
personnel of ours could doubt the success of such an undertaking? It is with a light 
heart and a confident air that we face the future. Perhaps we are due disappoint- 
ments and failures, perhaps we will have regrets and cares, but even so it is with a 
cheerful smile that we turn to the third lap of our journey, leaving behind us only 
pleasant memories of our first two years. 

Jresbman Class 

President Jasper Bassart 

Vice-President Vernon Bryant 

Secretary Margaret Bryan 

Treasurer Dorothy Slater 

The fall of 1928-29 brought to Atlantic Christian College about seventy five fresh- 
men representing eight states. In them the college has good reason to place high 
hopes and expectations. Of course, their first year does not show great results from 
the class itself as a unit, but in every organization on the campus the list of leading 
members will contain freshmen. It contains talented individuals who will soon be- 
come leaders in college and active citizens. When the potentialities of this promis- 
ing group are developed, who can tell what awaits the people in leaders and good 
citizens from this year's Freshman class? 



Page Eleven 



I 



3ook ftbree 

©inanimations 




■toff 



From right to left: 

Front Row: Ruth Manning, Joke Editor: Virginia Forbes, Ass't Editor. 
Janet Daugherty, Exchange Editor: Cora Lee Osborne, 
Ass. Business Manager 

Back Row: Meeda Weaver, Sport Editor; Bill Weigmann, Editor-in-Chief; 
Walton Thompson, Ass't. Business Manager; Robert Grady, 
Business Manager. 

Some of the members of the stall were unfortunate in not being present when 
the Staff picture was taken. This was due to unavoidable circumstances on 
the part of both the staff and the photographer. Catherine Ware, Literary Editor, 
Charles Bissett, Feature Editor, "and Sarah Askew, Alumni Editor, were the 
members not able to be present at the taking of the picture. 



Page Twelve 




&ttti?ttt Glmmril 



One of the greatest steps in the betterment 
campus was the organizing of the Student Ass 
step toward such an organization was made by 
interested in the honor system. Immediately 
having complete responsibility of its officers w 
the association is to "promote closer cooperati 
all matters pertaining to the welfare of the sch 
a greater sense of responsibility and a finer 
honor system; and to encourage and train for 



of student life on the A. C. College 
ociation. In November, 1927, the first 
the Y. M. C. A., which was particularly 
the student body became interested in 
lich the faculty granted. The purpose of 
on between faculty and student body in 
ool; to develop within the student body 
ollege spirit; to make efficient the 
more democratic living." 



The first president of the association was J. Park Nunn, who efficiently led it dur- 
ing its first trying days. The students from the beginning have realized the privi- 
leges and responsibilites of having such an organization. 

The present year is the first full one. During this time the Student Association 
has grown from an organization functioning only by the Honor Code to one that is 
foremost in every student activity. Through the efforts of its officers it has taken 
a broader outlook and now sponsors all activity that is not handled by other groups. 

Many hard problems have come up for the president, Thad Cherry, to solve, but 
all Tiave been handled firmly and with fairness. The other officers are, Vice Presi- 
dent, Monroe Fulghum; Secretary, Virginia Payne; Assistant Sec, Jane Daugherty. 
The council is composed of J. Walton Thompson from the Senior Class, James Denny 
from the Junion Class, Lottie Carawan from the Sophomore Class and Traver Farmer 
from the Freshman Class, Hilary Bowen from the Y. M. C. A., and Inez Barefoot 
from the Y. W. C. A. 

Recently the constitution was revised and made broader in its outlook. There is 
now a bright prospect lor a successful future. 



Page Thirteen 




I . w. <l a. 



The Y. W. C. A. of Atlantic Christian College has enjoyed a most suc- 
cessful year. The programs, under the directorship of Miss Virginia 
Payne, have been very interesting and helpful. The Y. W. was divided 
into four groups, each group being responsible' for one program a 
month. The group leaders Miss Doris Barefoot and Miss Ruth Manning, 
have shown themselves capable leaders. 

Each month the Y. W. discussed a different subject. Such subjects 
as Service, Heroes, Nature, Music, Character Building, Appreciation of 
Mother, have found a place in the discussion of the group. 

For the first time in the history of the Y. W. in A. C. C. the organiza- 
tion sponsored the Big Sister plan for Freshmen with a great deal of 
success. It is the plan to continue the work next year. 

On Sunday, May 19, 1929 the Y. ,W. C. A. held its Installation service 
for the new Cabinet. The service was short, but impressive. The 
"Candlelight Service," during which the old cabinet lighted the candles 
of the new cabinet, lent to the occasion an atmosphere of solemnity. 

The cabinets are as follows: 



THE RETIRING CABINET: 

President — Janet Daugherty 
Vice-President — Lottie Carawan 
Secretary — Myra Selby. 
Treasurer — Irene Harrison. 
Program Committee — Virginia Payne 



THE INCOMING CABINET: 

President — Virginia Payne. 
Vice-President — Clara Bass. 
Secretary — Rachel Rogerson. 
Treasurer — Doris Barefoot. 
Program Committee — Janet Daugerty 



Page Fourteen 




|. HL Ctt. A. 

The present officers of the Y. M. C, A. are: 

President Meeda Weaver 

Vice-President J. T. Forrest 

Secretary Staley Scott 

Treasurer Mr. J. W. Shockley 

Assistant Treasurer James Denny 

The other cabinet members are Bill Wiegman, Clyde Braden. 

Among the many organizations on the Atlantic Christian College campus none are 
more important in their influence than the Y.M.C.A. This organization has to a great 
extent, carried out its purpose, but, of course, as there always will be, much re- 
mains to be done. These aims are: 

To lead students to faith in God through Jesus Christ, 

To lead them into membership and service in the Christian Church, 

To promote their growth in Christian Faith, especially through the study of the 
Bible and prayer, and 

To influence them to devote themeslves in united effort with all Christians to 
making the will of Christ effective in human society, and to extending the Kingdom 
of God throughout the world. 

In carrying out this work the officers and cabinet members have done a great deal. 

Through the consecrated and tireless efforts of the cabinet, at least four boys will 
be sent to the Blue Ridge Conference for the ten day session of June 14-24. This 
training and inspiration will mean much not only in the lives of the individual boys, 
but in the group life of the Y. M. C. A. next year. 



Page Fifteen 




JfclUnwaliip 

THE OFFICERS OF FELLOWSHIP ARE: 

FIRST SEMESTER 

President Bryant Burrus and Elzie Autry 

Vice-President : 1 Lottie Carawan 

Secretary Edna Morgan 

Chaplain Staley Scott 

Chairman of Program Committee Bill Minshew 

SECOND SEMESTER 

President '-- Bill Minshew 

Vice-President Eva Mae Scott 

Secretary Margaret Johnson 

Chaplain . - _ — Hilary Bowen 

Chairman of Program Committee J. T. Forrest 

Chairman of Social Committee Janet Daugherty 

The Fellowship is a group of students composed primarily of those who will give their lives 
for full time Christian service, and others wishing' to fellowship with them. To know what it is, con- 
sider the words of our president, Mr. Hilley, "The Fellowship is the nucleus of the institution." It is 
the only religious organization open to the entire student body. 

Beyond the fellowship of students and communion of our spirits with the Eternal Spirit, the 
Fellowship extends its influence to the by-ways and hedges of the state and to all humanity. The 
aims of our group may best be seen in the work it is doing. 

The Fellowship is sharing in the great Pentecostal Program. It takes as its share the enlist- 
ment of twelve new workers for full time Christian service, the supplying of seventy-five pulpits in 
North Carolina by students and faculty, and helping other students to see the need of taking an active 
part in the religious program when they return to their community. 

Many know that the Fellowship extended its influence widely last year. A few trips have been 
made this year to Wilmington Christian Church, Dudley, Saratoga and Stantonsburg, The Fellow- 
ship conducted a meeting at Wilson Mills. Thirteen of the group- took an active part in the Bervicea. 



Page Sixteen 







Aletlfian IGifrrarg ^oroiij 



FIRST SEMESTER 

Bill Wiegmann President 

Hazel Sasser Vice-President 

Lottie Carawan Secretary 

Frances Manning Treasurer 

Esther Ricks Critic 

Clyde Braden Chaplain 

Earle Long Pianist 



OFFICERS 

SECOND SEMESTER 

Monroe Fulghum President 

Rachel Rogerson Vice-President 

Doris Barefoot Secretary 

Meeda Weaver Treasurer 

Marvin Bass Critic 

Daniel Hardison Chaplain 

Evelyn Batts Pianist 



Society Debaters: Virginia Payne and Bill Weigmann. 

As we come to the end of this year and we think of the work we have done, we look back with 
a smile and say well done, good and faithful servants. The Alethians have really put themselves in- 
to their work this year with plenty of enthusiasm, vivacity, and vim. There has been no sign of 
quitters and we feel proud of this fact. It is one sign worthy of mention in any organization. 

The programs at each meeting this year have been exceptionally good, for they have shown 
both talent and work on the part of the program committee and the members participating. We 
were very fortunate to have many of the most talented students on the campus in our society who 
appear on the programs at different times. We have had cooperation on every side and we hope to 
prove this to outsiders by receiving the program cup which we have won the past several years. 



Then surely everyone remembers the annual debate which we won again this year, 
success this year points to even a more successful year in 1929-30. 



Our 



Page Seventeen 




iramatir Club 

Mrs. Mamie Jennings Lucas, Director 

Officers: 

President, J. T. Forrest 

Secretary, Melba Gay 

Business Mgr. and Treas. J. Walton Thompson 



Virginia Payne 
Inez Barefoot 
Clara Bass 
Melba Gay 
Evelyn Batts 
Inez Narron 



MEMBERS: 

Irene Harrison - 
J. T. Forest 
Betty White 
James Williamson 
Marie Autry 
Vernon Bryant 



Noland Wiggins 

J. Walton Thompson 

Elzie Autry 

Gene Bynum 

Lewis Daniels 



The art of dramatics is being firmly imbedded in the minds and interest of Atlantic Christian 
College Students. The social and cultural values that accrue from dramatics are no longer looked upon 
lightly but happy is he who possesses these values. This new and stronger interest in this old field 
of interest may rightly be attributed to the work' of the Dramatic Club. Starting with a limited but 
select membership the club set as its goal he greatest year in its history. Because of the fact that 
we have not staged a great number of plays it need not be inferred that we have failed. To the con- 
trary, we have succeeded in a large way. This was more fully appreciated by those who saw the 
final play of the season in which our new stage scenery was used. For the first time we have a com- 
plete set of stage scenery that would be looked upon with envy by the dramatic clubs of some of the 
larger schools. This represented much expenditure of both time and money and we feel that it will 
remain as a monument to the work of the club for this year. 

During the spring there were presented on two occasions two one act plays which were received 
with much enthusiasm. The first to be given "Hearts" made such a hit that when the second. 
"Thursday Evening" was presented the seating capacity was insufficient and many were turned away 
for lack of room. 

In addition to these there was our annual commencement play, "Come Out of the Kitchen," 
which was presented on May 30. This play was the final program of the year and the contribution 
of the elub to the commencement exercises of the college. As usual it was a howling success both 
from the standpoint of acting and attendance. 



Page Eighteen 




filtration Club 



OFFICERS 



FIRST SEMESTER 
Pres. — Kate Brinson 
Vice-Pres. — Billy Minshew 
Sec. — Sarah Askew 
Treas. — Pauline Cox 



SECOND SEMESTER 
Pres. — Virginia Forbes 
Vice-Pres. — Virginia Payne 
Sec. — Nina Belangia 
Treas. — Annie Simmons 



i 



The purpose of this organization shall be to develop and make effective the personalities of its 
members, to promote a closer fellow feeling among those who are students in the department of Edu- 
cation, to cultivate a higher degree of appreciation of teaching as a profession by encouraging more 
thorough preparation and by the acceptance of high ethical standards; and to discuss educational 
problems which shall be of interest to all good citizens and especially those who are preparing to teach. 

Our programs have been interesting as well as instructive. We have members and visitors as 
speakers as well as the social activities including the annual picnic given by Mr. Grim who is our 
faculty advisor and originator of the club. 

Some of out outside speakers during the first semester were Su.pt. Curtis who spoke on "Edu- 
cation and International Good Will," and Pres. Hilley who told us "How to Get a Job and Hold It." 
A special program, was given to carry out Education Week with talks on School and Community, 
School and Home, Character Building in Teachers, Teachers' Debt to the Community, and Why I Chose 
Teaching as a Profession by student members. At the close of the first semester an entertainment 
afforded a pleasant close of the work. 

The second 'semester began with a round table discussion of the Ideal Teacher. On other pro- 
grams Mrs. Lucas spoke on "City of Vatican." and "World Beauties" ; Miss Daphne Carraway on 
"Outside Activities, of the School such as Junior Red Cross" followed by a dramatization "Epandinon- 
das" by Lois and Dorothy Lee. Mr. Hamlin gave us the "Educational Ideal of Washington and Jef- 
ferson." At the next meeting Mr, Barclay talked en "Characteristics of a Good Teacher." "Classifi- 
cation of Pupils" was given by Mr. Green. After each of these programs we had open discussion 
which have been enlightening and enriching. Every member of the club feels that he and she have 
been fully repaid by attending the Education Club this year and in the future we hope that every stu- 
dent of Atlantic Christian College will take advantage of the opportunity of being an active member 
of our club. 



Page Nineteen 



A* 




(&ln OXlub 



The Glee Club under the direction of Mr. Frank R. Hufty has enjoyed a season of 
successful musical programs receiving many commendable remarks from their audi- 
ences and a feeling of individual gratification that their efforts were successful. The 
club was evenly balanced with nine sopranos, seven second sopranos and five con- 
traltos. The soloists were Mrs. Jack Barnes, Miss Frances Manning, sopranos, Miss 
Hattie Mae Ricks, contralto. Much of the success of the Glee Club was due to the 
ability of their accompanists Miss Virginia B. Hufty and Miss Nannie Smith. The 
most pretentious of the club programs was the "Garden of Flowers" by Denza. 

OFFICERS 

Hattie Mae Ricks President 

Frances Manning Vice-President 

Ethellyn Brown Secretary and Treasurer 

MEMBERS 

Mrs. J. W. Shockley Inez Barefoot Margaret Sasser 

Mrs. Jack Barnes Sara Askew Clara Bass 

Mrs. James Lawson Nina Belangia Doris Barefoot 

Miss Martha Edmundston Kate Brinson Nannie Smith 

Emma Lou Windley Rachel Rogerson Ruby Thompson 

Esther Ricks Virginia Payne Helen Finch 

Dorothy Slater Hazel Sasser Mable Silverthorne 

Mary Elizabeth Oden Ruth Sasser Rosa Verle Brake 

Mamie Harper Bettie White 



Page Twenty 





ujma ®ait 



The Phi Sigma Tau Sorority is the oldest Greek Letter organiza- 
tion on the campus. It was founded in the spring of 1913. Susie Grey 
Woodard, who later became Mrs. Luther Tomlinson initiated the move- 
ment, and she was elected its first President. The first annual banquet 
was held that spring, with only the eight charter members and the three 
taken in present. We now have seventy members. The seventeenth 
annual banquet was held this year at the Briggs Hotel, Saturday night, 
May eighteenth. It is the custom of the sorority to entertain the Sigma 
Tau Chi Sorority at a picnic each year and to have an annual banquet, 
each member inviting her own guest. 



MEMBERS NOW IN COLLEGE ARE: 



Mable Amerson 
Sarah Askew 
Grace Holden 
Margaret Leggett 



Mary Mattox 
Cora Lee Osborne 
Esther Ricks 
HatSe Mae Ricks 



Dorothy Slater 
Catherine Ware 
Ada Lee Canady, Sponsor 
Herberta Stuckey 



Page Twenty-One 




Founded — 19 lit at Atlantic Christian College 

Colors — Gold and white 

Flowers — Yellow Chrysanthemum. 

OFFICERS 

President — Renno. Jenkins 
Vice-President — Melba Gay 
Secretary — Merle Owen 
Treasurer — Inez Barefoot 

MEMBERS 

Nina Belangia, Clara Bass, Helen Belangia, Janet Daugherty, Eloise Grady, 
Elsie Grady, Earle Long, Ruth Manning, Mary Elizaheth Oden, 
Virginia Payne, and Rachel Rogerson. 
Members taken in this year: 

Clara Bass, Helen Balangia, Mary Elizabeth Oden, and Virginia Payne 
Sorority Sponsor — Miss Martha Edmunston 



Page Twenty-Two 




Colors: Gold and White 



John Barclay 



FOUNDED — 

FOUNDERS 
CHARTER MEMBERS 



Flower: Daisy 



Dr. E. L. Fox 



E. N. Grady, John Winfield, Anderson Boswell 

Moses T. Moye, C. M. Banks, Lehman Bamhill 

FRATRE IN FACULTATE 

Dr. B. G. Carson T. L. Anthony 

CHAPTER ROLL 

CLASS OF '29 

J. Robert Grady A. Randolph Munn 

CLASS OF '30 

Bill Wiegmann, Clyde Braden, Fred Hardison 

CLASS OF '31 

Horace Isler, Ruric Anderson, Luther Bardin, Meeda Weaver, 

Warren Whitehurst, Bill Meekins, Cleveland Pittman 

CLASS OF '32 

Sidney Eagles, Jasper Basart, R. G. Banks, Wilbur Jefferson 



Page Twenty -Three 




j^ma Alpfja iFrafrntttg 



Flower: Sweet Peas 



Established 1925 
Motto: Semper Est Amicitia 

Colors: Silver and Lavender 

Officers 
1920-30 



R. H. S. Harrell, President 

Fuller Jones Vice President Clement Lucas, Secretary-Treasurer 

Vernon Bryant, Chaplain Titus McAdams, Sergeant-at-Arms 



Frater in Faoultate 

Cortell K. Holsapple, M. A. 

Fratres in Collegio 



1929 

S. T. Cherry 
Monroe Fulghum 
Roma Boykin 

1931 

Frank Denby 
Raymond Harrell 
Marvin Bass 
Clement Lucas 
Williard Williams 



1930 
James Denny 
Fuller Jones 
Titus McAdams 

1932 
Louis Daniels 
Braxton Davis 
Vernon Bryant 



Gorden E. Bos well, Graduate Student 



Page Twenty-Four 



^tgma Alptja 

We feel, in presenting the Sigma Alpha Fraternity to those who do not 
know them quite as well as they should, much like P. T. Barnum, whose 
rotund breast surely must have swelled with pride as he read the billboard 
advertisements of his famous aggregation in which he modestly announced 
his show as "The Greatest Show on Earth, a Galaxy of Scintillating World- 
Wonders Brought from the Four Corners of the Globe at Phenomenal Ex- 
pense." 

For these men we are about to introduce are campus-renowned, and, 
although all of them are native Americans, many of them have wandered 
into the four corners of these United States and back again, bringing with 
them intellectual treasures, and tales of travel picked up here and there at 
random, which thy bestow with reckless abandon upon their Fraternity 
Brothers. 

The Greek-Letter Societies of Atlantic Christian College are undoubted- 
ly the greatest social and economic influence in the student body of the 
college. The extent to which they provide for the material and social wel- 
fare of the students is, perhaps, not sufficiently well understood, nor is 
there generally an appreciation of the extent to which the students have 
gone in providing for their own needs. It may be of general interest, 
therefore, to present some of the facts concerning one of these societies, 
with some accounts of its establishment and activities. 

Sigma Alpha Fraternity of Atlantic Christian College was established in 
the year of 1925 by twelve regular matriculated students of the College, in 
an effort to revive the national organiaztion of the same name which ex- 
isted at a majority of the colleges in Virginia and various universities 
throughout the country. 

At the present time Sigma Alpha Fraternity maintains a well-equipped 
Fraternity House at 60 2 W. Gold Street. A House Committee is respon- 
sible for the enforcement of rules and regulations governing the use of the 
House. Good order is maintained without difficulty. Infractions of rules 
are infrequent, of a minor character, and are usually punished by the im- 
position of a fine. 

The practical advantages to a student of a house furnished, organized, 
and administered entirely in his interest are obvious. In no way can his 
material needs be more satisfactorily met as regards entertainment, hous- 
ing, and conditions under which to pursue his studies. They profit by 
contact with each other and by participation in a community enterprise in 
which each has a voice and proportionate responsibility. The self-govern- 
ment of the Fraternity House tends to develop in members self-restraint 
and regard for the rights of others. 

Saturday-night smokers, to which alumni members and candidates 
being "rushed" for the Fraternity are invited, are frequent in the autumn 
and early winter. Occassionally the Fraternity blossoms forth with a 
banquet. Both are successful events of their kind. 



49098 



Page Twenty-Five 



C. L. HARM LlitfARY 

ATLANTIC CHRISTVrtN COLLEGE 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 



Hit B* 1 ■ ^S HE?" 3" wFi* B 






v* s )^i^\# 




JT ».;;*€, *^>:W? 


». . « . . ,'' v '-';''■ 



iFocthall ®?am 



Reading left to right the men are: back row, Barnhill, Cherry, An- 
derson, Banks, Isler, Bailey, Merritt, Denby, and Anthony, Coach. Sec- 
ond row, Meekins, Bryant, Fulghum, Hawkins, Wiggins, Bass, Forrest, 
Brinkley. Front row, Hardison, Howell, Weddell, Captain Munn, Uz- 
zle, Scott and Jones. "Mutt" mascot. 

Mark Anthony, Georgia star, came to A. C. C. as coach in 1928. 
When the squad reported in September prospects seemed fairly bright, 
but right at the beginning of training a jinx "grabbed" the team and 
held it throughout the season. Many men were lost because of in- 
juries; many of the best on the squad. The injured men were: Denby, 
Fulghum, Hawkins, Bass, Howell, Weddell, and Jones. The team 
went through the season winning one game and losing seven. Two of 
the defeats were due directly to fumbles. The boys played great 
games at times, especially against Catawba and Milligan. Four of the 
squad were seniors and will be lost next year. Munn and Cherry will 
be missed especially. The team was christened "Bulldogs" after the 
season ended, and we are looking forward to a great season for the 
"Bulldogs" next year. 



Page Twenty-Six 



*„. 



1 " f 


^M^^ 






1 


•.*-cli» kC Wk«"I 


«> c v 




" JSJf.VL.^ci'.AA' 






1 . 

1 H 



laskrtball Seam 

Reading left to right. Back row, Jones, Mgr., Gillette, Wiggins, 
Bryant, Coach Anthony. Second row, Uzzle, Bailey, Banks, Bissette. 
Front row, Fulghum, Captain Brinkley. and Munn. 

The basketball season was a success. Fulghum ran wild at forward 
and was one of the highest, if not the highest, scorers in the state for 
the season. Bailey was a tower of strength at center. Munn and Bis- 
sette were able helpers for Fulghum at forward. Uzzle played a great 
defensive game and was ably assisted by Captain Brinkley and Banks, 
The team will be hard hit this year by the loss of Brinkley, Bailey, Ful- 
ghum, and Munn. All the above named men except Bailey have 
served their quota of years. Following is a brief summary of the team 
and the season: The team played sixteen games, winning nine and 
losing seven. The percentage placed them well up in the standing of 
the "Little Six" Conference. High Point College was the only team to 
defeat the Christians more than once, the Purple Panthers turning the 
trick twice. The players on the team were pretty accurate at hitting 
the hoops and scored in this manner: Fulghum 206 points, Munn 94 
points, Bailey 79 points, Brinkley 66 points, Bissette 40 points, and Uz- 
zle 37 points. The team total for the season was 535 points. 



Page Twenty-Seven 



Social (Lalenoar 



Miss Ruth Rankin in Concert 

Fine Arts Recital 

Play "Hearts" by Dramatic Club 

Inter Society Debate 

Fine Arts Recital 

Debate with Catawba 

Miss Dicie Howell in Concert 

Junior Senior Banquet 

Miss Melba Gay in Senior Expression Recital 

Mrs. Jack Barnes in Junior Piano Recital 

Miss Mary Mattox in Senior Expression Recital 

Play "Thursday Evening" by Dramatic Club 

Fine Arts Recital 

Sigma Alpha Fraternity Banquet 

Phi Sigma Tau Sorority Banquet 

Sigma Tau Chi Sorority Banquet 

Joint Literary Society Program 

Baccalaureate Sermon 

Dedication of J. J. Harper Chair of Bible 

Farewell Sermon 

Phi Kappa Alpha Fraternity Banquet 

Class Day Exercises 

Play "Come out of the Kitchen" by Dramatic Club May 30 

Graduation Exercises May 31 

Alumni Banquet May 31 



February 13 
February 20 
March 13 
March 16 
April 2 
April 10 
April 16 
April 18 
April 30 
May 7 
May 9 
May 13 
May 14 
May 17 
May 18 
May 22 

May 25 
May 26 
May 26 
May 26 
May 27 
May 30 



Page Twenty-Eight 



White Slippers For Graduation 

Just the style in White Kid to thrill 
the hearts of every Sweet Girl Grad- 
uate 

Beautiful Pump Styles 
with high or low heel. 

$4.95 to $7.95 

White Moire Satin Pumps Dyed Any Color 




Beautiful Silk Hosiery to Match 
Your Costume 



ROSCOE GRIFFIN SHOE CO. 



108 E. NASH ST. 



WILSON, N. C. 



TUXEDOS AND FULL DRESS 

SUITS, INCLUDING VESTS 

FOR RENT 

Style Plus Clothes 
Shop 

US S. GOLDSBORO ST. 



WILSON DYE WORKS 

Cleaners and Dyers 

Hats Cleaned and Blocked 
Altering and Repairing 

Phone 119 110 S. Tarboro St. 

UNDER PRESENT MANAGEMENT 15 YEARS 



FIRESTONE 

FIRESTONE TIRE STORES, Inc. 

Prompt Road Service 

206 SOUTH GOLDSBORO ST. PHONE 335 

Wilson Insurance & Realty Co. 
Insurance and Real Estate 

George T. Stronach, Sec'ty. and Treasurer 



i£«i«»o< 



Page Twenty-Nine 



RIALTO THEATRE 



202 SOUTH TARBORO ST. 



PHONE 586 



"WE BRING THK GOOD PICTURES BACK" 

First National — Mel ro-Goldwj n — Paramount — Fox Pictures 

"The Cream of the Industry" 

Follow the A. C. C. Students and you will always see a Rood show. 
NO! IT'S ONLY A DIME 



SER VICE 
Cleaning Works 



College Jewelry and Banquet 
Favors 



Phone 885 



5 Points 




Panama Hats Cleaned and 

Blocked $1.00 

Linen Suits (leaned and Pressed __ .7."> 



Wilson Theatre Bldg. 
WILSON, \. »'. 




G. S. Tucker & Co. i 

i 

FURNITURE— HOME OUTFITTERS J 

i 

RALEIGH, CLAYTON, SMITHFIELD j 

I 

S. Goldsboro St. WILSON, N. C. Phone 174 j 



WILSON 
DRUG CO. 

We Appreciate Your Business 
114 S. Tarboro St. Wilson, N. C 



BEST HOT DOGS IN TOWN 



CONEY ISLAND 



S. Goldsboro Street 



Stokes-Tomi'mson Co. 

Home of Hart Schaffner & Marx Clothes 

10% Discount To All College Boys 



Page Thirty 



COME TO SEE US 



134 S. TARBORO STREET 



MOSS and COMPANY 



TREAT PEOPLE RIGHT 



Ideal Beauty 
Shop 

'A thing of Beauty Is a Joy Forever 
It's Loveliness Increases" 

Beautiful! Ideal! 

NEXT TO LYRIC THEATRE 



The WOMAN'S 
SHOP 

Gossard Corsets 

READY-TO-WEAR, MILLINERY 
< Jarroll Building, Second Floor 

PHONE 440 



THE PICTURES IN THIS ISSUE 
Were Made By 

Holders Stadi® 

Opposite Wilson Theatre 



The Collegiate 

Published Bi-Monthly By 

The Students of 
ATLANTIC CHRISTIAN COLLEGE 

SUBSCRIPTION $1.00 PER YEAR 



»;*■■*•■.'«»• .«...-« 



Page Thirty-One 



FIRST CHRISTI AN CHURCH 

CORNER VANCE AND GOLDSBORO STREETS 

JOHN BARCLAY, Pastor 

The Church Home of Students 
and Young People 



"It Pays To Look Well" 

To Look Neat and Clean 

You are often seen. 

MULLEN'S 

Barber Shop 

First National ISank Building 



•The Men's Shop' 



oJ/o ;CJo in 



Clothing — Haberdashers 



Wilson, N. C. \ 209 E. Nash St. Wilson, N. C, 



FOR HEALTHFUL RECREATION, PLAY BILLIARDS AT 

L. A.'s Recreation Parlor 

POCKET BILLIARDS AND SNOOKER 
120 S. Goldsboro Street 
WBLSON. X. ('. 



We wish to thank the Faculty and Student body for 

their liberal patronage during the past year. 
We hope our service will merit your future business. 
Remember our store is headquarters for every 
thing in the Jewelry & Optical lines. 

DENNY BROTHERS COMPANY 

P. (>. NEXT TO IS 



Thomas- Yelverton Company 

"BETTER FURNITURE- 
FUNERAL DIRECTORS— 

—AMBULANCE SERVICE 

CALL 58 WE ARE NEVER LATE 

Page Thirty-Two 



AMERSON-BOSWELL COMPANY 

EXCLUSIVE 

Funeral Directors and Embalmers 

Ambulance Service 

PHONE: DAY 210 PHOXE: NIGHT 571 — 1586 

J. J. Amerson, Manager Wilson, North Carolina 



WILSON HARDWARE COMPANY 

Leaders in 

HARDWARE, BUILDING MATERIALS AND 

SPORTING GOODS 

"THE COURT HOUSE IN FRONT OF US" 

WILSON, N. C. 



MuUcU* Ma, &2L 


Goodman's Shoe Shop 


208 South Tarboro St. 


Wilson's Old and Reliable Shop 


Barbecue For All Occasions 


We pride ourselves 


PHONE 1077 


in having the College 


WE DELIVER 


Trade — Just "Goodman's 



•^SKT'^'^r- ~"~ »>aos«»t»s»son 




TAVANNES 
WATCHES 

Famous the world over! 
and sold here. 



Many Other Nice Gifts 
for Graduation 



*£$? 



at 



Church well's 



THE QUALITY SHOP 

SOLE AGENTS FOR KIRK STERLING SILVER 



Page Thirty-Three 



I 



The P. D. Gold 
Publishing Co, 



j PRINTERS AND PUBLISHERS 

I 

j WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 

i 



WE GUARANTEE OUR WORK TO BE FIRST CLASS AND 
EMINENTLY SATISFACTORY TO OUR PATRONS. 
WE SHALL BE PLEASED TO FURNISH YOU WITH SAMPLES AND ! 






j ESTIMATES ON ANYTHING FROM A CARD TO A BOUND BOOK, j 




The emblem of a Good Motor 

Citizen carried by more than 

a million ear owners in 

America 

LEGALLY 

Protects You ) physically 

FINANCIALLY 

PROTECTS YOUR CAR 
MECHANICALLY. 



DUFF'S 

"THE BEST IN MUSIC" 

WEBER PIANOS 

ORTHOPHONIC VICTROLAS 

VICTOR RECORDS 

213 EAST NASH STREET WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Page Thirty Four 



UIL 





i 

I 

Visions created by the imagination pre- 
cede the achievement of any really great 
accomplishment. The ability to weave 
the threads of imagination into the finish- | 

ed fabric is equally important. i 

It has been the privilege of the ED- 
WARDS & BROUGHTON COMPANY to 
interpret the ideas of the Staff and create ( 

in material form their vision. I 

From the art work and engravings to the { 

finished book, this volume is the result of 
organized cooperation with the Staff. 

Such able cooperation is one of the "vis- 
ions" which precede the building of a suc- 
cessful business, and is a part of the work- 
ing policy of the EDWARDS & BROUGH- 
TON COMPANY. 

To those Staffs desiring complete coop- 
eration from art work and engravings to 
the finished book, we offer unexcelled ser- 
vice. Complete service means undivided 
responsibility as to the result — one organ- 
ization to correspond and talk with — one 
trained director to merge the many ingre- 
dients into the finished product. 

You, too, may be proud of your annual. 

Correspondence is Invited. 



diwardls& Brourfhtomi 



I 

onmoajrw \ 



Raleigh, North Carolina I 

I 



Page Thirty-Five 






ATLANTIC 
CHRISTIAN 
COLLEGE 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 




A standard college for women and men. 
Schools of 

Liberal Arts,, Fine Arts, Religion and Business 
Write for Catalogue 



Page Thirty-Six